Richard Upper: My Life As A Teenage Rock Photographer

Richard Upper: My Life As A Teenage Rock Photographer

Photographer Richard Upper got his start taking pictures in Hawaii in the late 1960s. As a teenager he began shooting rock concerts for local concert promoters. He soon branched out into a career that would include many album covers, magazine spreads and poster art. He had his first album cover at 16, Steve Miller's "Rock Love." In time his photography began appearing regularly in magazines, billboards, advertising and more album art. Traveling to Los Angeles meant the chance to shoot artists like The Rolling Stones at the Forum. At age 19, Richard moved to L.A., where he was hired by a number of record companies to document their artists' concerts and publicity. He was immediately thrust into the concert scene, photographing bands for all the labels including Rod Stewart & The Faces, Van Halen and Blondie to name a few. Upper's resume also includes album covers for Santana, The Faces, Rory Gallagher and Rod Stewart, as well as a 30-minute rockumentary on Blondie which he shot in 1977 at the Whiskey A Go Go on the Sunset Strip. Currently Richard has assembled his archives of vintage rock images and has shown his work in galleries around the country.

Duration: 22:06

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Orange Amps Launch Their Retro 1970s Effect Pedals
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Orange Amps Launch Their Retro 1970s Effect Pedals

Orange Amplification announces the return of three iconic effects pedals; the Orange Phaser, Orange Sustain and Orange Distortion — with the trio’s vintage characteristics reworked for the present day. The modern story of these classic units starts in 2019, when an Orange message board went viral for a photo of the long-discontinued Sustain pedal from the early 1970s, with its outsized form-factor and art nouveau typography. Not long after, the company found the original schematics and the project was started. The rest of the story writes itself: as more evidence was unearthed about the Sustain and its two brothers, the Distortion and Phaser, Orange set about remaking these beasts, retaining their most-loved qualities and incorporating the contemporary features; LEDs, DC inputs etc — expected on 21st-century effects pedals. The result is three seasoned British made pedals re-tuned and ready for the modern age. First up is the Orange Sustain, which smooths and regulates guitar sounds, acting like an overdrive for clean tones with added chime and warmth. Boosting volume without scuffing purity and making soft parts louder and the loud parts softer, it offers an expressive, nuanced and three-dimensional take on the sustain/compressor effect. Then there’s the Orange Phaser, the most elegantly simple of the reboots, with just one knob and one job: to bring sweet psychedelic swirl to any rig, its dial modulating guitar tones from woozy sweeps to fast, choppy stabs via kaleidoscopic insistent, whirling pulses. With four-stage circuitry rebirthed from the original schematics combined with modern techniques inside the box reduces the noise floor. The Orange Phaser adds maximum spin with minimum fuss. And finally there’s the Orange Distortion, with vintage appearance up top but all-new circuitry below deck, replacing the original’s back-to-back diode design with an amp circuit and tone stack with a user-adjustable treble. New design doesn’t mean new sound though — the Orange Distortion retains all the bite, growl, warmth and howl of its 1970s forefather, from fat gravelly textures to red-hot screamers and maximum saturation. The trio of effects pedals are a perfect homage to one of rock’s golden ages, but also ripe for any modern set-up. The strong aluminium chassis and classic look offer a 50-year-back teleportation. Then, stomping on the footswitches completes the time-travel: these might be new for 2022, but with the Orange vintage pedals, The Song Remains The Same.
16:439 days ago